Global Religion Research Initiative

Round 3 Award Recipients

Congratulations to the Round 3 Global Religion Research Initiative award recipients! The GRRI received more than 120 research proposals from scholars at 89 colleges and universities around the world in the third round of competition, which closed in mid-October. The submissions were reviewed by leading social science scholars and 44 of the proposals were awarded funding this round.

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Book Leave Fellowships
Project Launch Grants
Project Title
The Feasibility of Google as a Cross-Cultural Measurement Instrument for Gathering Religion Data
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With the rise of social media platforms like Google and Twitter, researchers have a new source of public opinion data that are user-driven, time-sensitive, possibly less subject to social desirability biases than surveys and are cheap and easy to obtain. Though studies using these methods are beginning to appear across the social science literature, many questions remain about whether this is a passing social science fad or if such data can improve upon traditional surveys. This study will develop and attempt to validate at least 30 cross-national social media measures of religion, morality, and deviance against existing data from the World Values Survey, Pew, and the International Social Survey Program. Based on the data we will develop at least one peer-reviewed publication demonstrating the validity of similar measures and instructing their use for other researchers, make the entire dataset available for public use, and develop a grant proposal for additional funding.
Amy Adamczyk
Professor of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at The Graduate Center, CUNY
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About the Researcher
Dr. Amy Adamczyk is Professor of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the Programs of Doctoral Study in Sociology and Criminal Justice at The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY). Her research focuses on how different contexts (e.g. nations, counties, friendship groups), and personal religious beliefs shape people’s deviant, criminal, and health-related attitudes and behaviors. She has published over 40 peer-reviewed journal articles and is the recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Book Award from the International Section of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences for her first book, Cross-national Public Opinion about Homosexuality (University of California Press 2017).
Steve Hitlin
Professor of Sociology at University of Iowa
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About the Researcher
Dr. Steven Hitlin is Professor of Sociology at the University of Iowa. He focuses on social psychology, with interests in the influences on and consequences of individual senses of morality, self, and agency. He is the co-author (w/Sarah Harkness) of the recent book Unequal Foundations: Inequality, Morality and Emotions Across Cultures (2018, Oxford University Press).
Project Title
Transnational and Local Islam: Who's on Your Side and Violent Attitudes Toward Non-Muslims
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This project examines conflicting narratives on religion and tolerance in Indonesia—a country known for both its long-standing tolerant interpretation of Islam as well as rising tides of radicalism. We argue that the relationship between religion and violence is conditional on a critical distinction in transnational and local types of Islam. Using a survey in Java, we test hypotheses that focus on how religion type impacts perceptions of group size, threat perception, and attitudes on violence toward out-groups.
Jori Breslawski
Doctoral Candidate of Political Science at University of Maryland
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About the Researcher
Jori Breslawski is a PhD Candidate at the University of Maryland. Her research centers on the legitimacy-seeking tactics of non-state actors, nascent democratic institutions, transnational networks, and identity. Her work is forthcoming in the Journal of Conflict Resolution as well as Terrorism and Political Violence. Her dissertation investigates the characteristics of civilian populations that shape the way rebels govern territory they control.
Brandon Ives
Doctoral Candidate of Political Science at University of Maryland
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About the Researcher
Brandon Ives is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland. His research focuses on the conditions in which identity affects nonviolent and violent conflict. His dissertation examines how government type structures the impact of identity on ethnic protest. Published work includes an article forthcoming in Journal of Conflict Resolution.
Dissertation Year Fellowships
International Collaboration Grants
Project Title
Socializing Human Relations in Religious Schools: An Empirical Study of Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, and Christian Adolescents in India and the United States
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We will carry out three studies in India and the United States that investigate what adherents of Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam teach adolescents about the right way to treat people of other faiths, paying special attention to attitudes toward Muslims. First, we will collect questionnaire data from Hindu, Buddhist, and Muslim religious school instructors in India, as well as Christian and Muslim religious school instructors in the U.S. Second, we will collect focused discussion group data from parents whose children attend these schools. Third, we will survey members of all four religious groups across both countries via the internet, in order to confirm that our earlier findings are societally relevant. Overall, we intend to shed light on how human relations are socialized within these religious groups, paving the way for future interventions aimed at reducing between-group bias.
Lauren Crane
Associate Professor of Psychology and East Asian Studies at Wittenberg University
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About the Researcher
Lauren Shapiro Crane is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the East Asian Studies Program at Wittenberg University (USA), where her research program focuses primarily on the role of language socialization in human development, with an emphasis on religious and educational contexts. She was a Fulbright-Nehru Senior Research Scholar in Varanasi, India, and has conducted additional research studies in Japan and South Korea. She earned her Ph.D. from Stanford University.
Shabana Bano
Assistant Professor of Psychology at Banaras Hindu University
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About the Researcher
Shabana Bano (Ph.D., Banaras Hindu University) is a faculty member in the Department of Psychology at Banaras Hindu University in India. Over the past two decades, she has contributed to cross-cultural research projects based in Germany, Switzerland, the United States, and Canada, where she was a Shastri Fellow at the University of Guelph. Her research focuses primarily on issues of social identity, acculturation, mutual attitudes, and intercultural relations among Hindus and Muslims in India.
Ramesh C. Mishra
Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Banaras Hindu University
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About the Researcher
Ramesh Chandra Mishra is a Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Banaras Hindu University, India. He has been a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Shastri Research Fellow at Queen’s University (Canada), a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Konstanz (Germany) and Geneva (Switzerland), a Fellow-in-Residence of the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Study, and a Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at Wittenberg University (USA). His research has focused on understanding the influences of cultural factors, including religious schooling, on human and societal development.
Nona Moskowitz
Associate Professor of Sociology at Wittenberg University
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About the Researcher
Nona Moskowitz is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the East Asian Studies Program at Wittenberg University (USA). She earned a Ph.D. in linguistic anthropology at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on the self, youth culture, institutional value systems, national identities, and philosophical questions of being and becoming. She has published articles on misunderstandings that arise from differing cultural beliefs between teachers and students, Japanese girls’ self-referent term choice in the context of appropriating a gendered self, and moral dilemmas in the field of anthropology.
Sushma Pandey
Professor of Psychology at DDU Gorakhpur University
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About the Researcher
Dr. Sushma Pandey is Professor and Head of the Department of Psychology at DDU Gorakhpur University in Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh, India. She is interested in the study of child and adolescent development in relation to socio-cultural variables, including religion. She has directed a number of research projects in this area that were funded by national grant agencies, and she has published the results of these studies in various national and international journals, as well as research monographs.
Robert Roeser
Bennett Pierce Professor of Care, Compassion and Human Development at Penn State University
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About the Researcher
Robert W. Roeser is the Bennett Pierce Professor of Care, Compassion and Human Development at Penn State University, where he focuses on school as a main cultural context affecting the academic, social-emotional and ethical development of children and adolescents; as well as the role of contemplative practices like mindfulness and compassion training for parents, teachers and students. He has a Ph.D. from the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan (1996) and holds master's degrees in religion and psychology, developmental psychology and clinical social work. He works closely with the Mind and Life Institute, a non-profit organization devoted to an interdisciplinary understanding of the mind, and was involved in creating the field of mindfulness in education through the Mind and Life Educational Research Network (MLERN).
Project Title
International Religious NGOs and Civil Society Formation in North Korea
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This study examines how international religious non-governmental organizations (IRNGOs) pursue the seeming non-political goals of educational training, health services, and humanitarian aid in North Korea. As Western-based, and largely evangelical, Christian organizations, these IRGNOS walk a thin political tightrope, as they negotiate between western governments and donors and North Korean regime officials and local community members. This study explores how four IRNGOs activate transnational religious resources and practices to form and reproduce civil society relationships in historically closed North Korea.
William Hayes
Associate Professor of Sociology at Gonzaga University
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About the Researcher
William A. Hayes (Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley, 2005) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology at Gonzaga University. His research and teaching interests focus on state-civil society relations in East Asia, religious movements and democratization, and public memory and state violence. His work has appeared in many journals, including Journal of Human Rights, Pacific Affairs, and Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.
Joseph Yi
Associate Professor of Political Science at Hanyang University
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About the Researcher
Joseph Yi received a Ph.D. in political science at the University of Chicago and serves as associate professor of political science at Hanyang University. Yi examines civil society and individual liberty in various contexts, from well-established liberal democracies (e.g., USA) to relatively new democracies (e.g., South Korea) to closed autocracies (e.g., North Korea). His articles have been published in Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Journal of Homosexuality, Journal for Scientific Study of Religion, Pacific Affairs, Political Quarterly, PS: Political Science & Politics, Review of Religious Research, and Society.
Project Title
Global Youth Project: Studying Cross-Cultural Developments of Religiosity & Philanthropy
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The Global Youth Development Network (GYDN) will prepare collaborations to study the link between religiosity and philanthropy across cultures for youth in a range of ages and life stages (between the ages of 13 to 30 years old, adolescence to emerging adulthood). As youth progress toward adulthood, the project team is first curious how religious, spiritual, and moral values are established and developed across cultural contexts. Second, the project team is also interested in understanding how youth establish and develop philanthropic values and practices differently across cultural contexts. Third, the project team is interested in the development of and connection between religiosity and philanthropy, within and across cultural contexts.
Patricia Snell Herzog
Melvin Simon Chair and Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
Patricia Snell Herzog is the Melvin Simon Chair and Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies in the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI. Prior to joining IUPUI, Herzog was an Associate Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Center for Social Research at the University of Arkansas. Herzog’s interests include social scientific investigations of charitable giving, youth and emerging adults, and religiosity, including the books American Generosity: Who Gives and Why (Herzog and Price 2016, Oxford University Press) and Souls in Transition: The Religious Lives of Emerging Adults in America (Smith and Snell 2009, Oxford University Press).
Gabriel Berger
Associate Professor of Administration and Business at Universidad de San Andrés
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About the Researcher
Gabriel Berger is an associate professor at the School of Management and Business of Universidad de San Andrés (UdeSA), Buenos Aires, Argentina, who obtained a Ph.D. in Social Policy and a Master in Management of Human Services from the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University (USA). Dr. Berger was formerly the dean of UdeSA’s School of Management and Business (2013-2017), was the founder and director of the Graduate Program in Nonprofit Organizations launched in 1997, and in 2007, Berger launched UdeSA’s Center for Social Innovation (www.udesa.edu.ar/cis). Berger has served as a board member of the International Society for Third Sector Research (ISTR), is a member of Social Enterprise Knowledge Network (www.sekn.org), for which he served two terms as its general coordinator, and he has collaborated as an advisor to NGOs, businesses and foundations in several Latin American countries and in the USA.
Chelsea Clark
Visiting Faculty and Research Associate at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
Chelsea Clark is a Research Associate at the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Currently, she manages the school’s Study of High Net Worth Philanthropy, Generosity For Life project, and Human Needs Index, among other projects. Chelsea’s research interests include the intersection of political and charitable giving and the influence of interpersonal relationships on philanthropic behaviors.
Dana Doan
Graduate Student at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
Dana Doan is currently a doctoral student in philanthropic studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Dana joined the doctoral program with 20 years of work experience focused on international relations, community-led development, and social innovation. In 2009, she established the LIN Center for Community Development, the first community foundation in Vietnam, to support and meet the growing needs of philanthropic individuals and institutions in and around Ho Chi Minh City. In 2012, she was selected for the CSIP Social Entrepreneur Fellowship for her vision to establish the first donor advisory service in Vietnam. Dana continues to advise donors and not-for-profit organizations operating in Vietnam.
Jamie Goodwin
Doctoral Student at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
Jamie Goodwin is a Phd candidate, graduate assistant for the Lake Institute on Faith and Giving, and senior fellow at Sagamore Institute. Goodwin studies philanthropy in Spanish-speaking cultures, faith and philanthropy and relationships and the public good, and her dissertation will examine the nature and role of cross-cultural communities of faith between the United States and Cuba. Goodwin’s previous work includes serving as Executive Director of Global Indiana, Visiting Lecturer at the University of Seville, Director of Advancement at Covenant Christian High School, Reporter for the Indianapolis Star, and Spanish and journalism teacher, also at Covenant.
David King
Karen Lake Buttrey Director of the Lake Institute on Faith & Giving and Assistant Professor of Philanthropic Studies at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
David P. King is the Karen Lake Buttrey Director of the Lake Institute on Faith and Giving as well as Assistant Professor of Philanthropic Studies within the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. King is a graduate of Samford University and Duke Divinity School whose Ph.D. in Religion is from Emory University. Trained as an American religious historian, King’s research interests include investigating how the religious identity of faith-based nonprofits shapes their motivations, rhetoric, and practice, and King has served local churches and national faith-based organizations in facilitating conversations with faith leaders, donors, and fundraisers around the intersections of faith and giving.
Bhekinkosi Moyo
Director, Africa Centre on Philanthropy and Social Investment at University of Witwatersrand
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About the Researcher
Bhekinkosi Moyo is a director for the Africa Centre on Philanthropy and Social Investment and adjunct professor at the University of Witwatersrand. Moyo is a published author who writes primarily about African philanthropy, civil society and governance.
Phuong Anh Nguyen
Consultant at PYXERA Global, Vietnam
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About the Researcher
Phuong Anh Nguyen has 15 years working in social sector in Vietnam and other parts of Southeast Asia. Her areas of expertise include resource mobilization, organizational capacity building, strategic philanthropy and impact assessment for NGOs and social enterprises. Phuong Anh is currently spearheading a philanthropic education initiative among Vietnamese youth and involves in researches on volunteerism and giving in Vietnam. She is a co-author of Philanthropic Sector in Vietnam published The Palgrave Handbook of Global Philanthropy.
Çağle Okten
Associate Professor of Economics at Bilkent University
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About the Researcher
Çağla Okten is an Associate Professor of Economics at Bilkent University, Turkey who received her doctoral degree from Northwestern University. Okten's research has focused on Turkey, Indonesia, and the U.S., and she has published articles in the Journal of Public Economics and Journal of Population Economics and World Development. Okten’s award-winning scholarship includes the Virginia Hodgkinson Research Prize for an article in 2000 and again in 2016 for a co-edited volume, entitled the Palgrave Handbook of Global Philanthropy.
Una Osili
Associate Dean for Research and International Programs, Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies, and Dean’s Fellow for the Mays Family Institute on Diverse Philanthropy at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
Una O. Osili is Associate Dean for Research and International Programs and Dean’s Fellow, Mays Institute on Diverse Philanthropy, at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Osili earned her B.A. in Economics at Harvard University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University, and she has significant experience in research and policy in the fields of household behavior and economic policy. Osili leads the research and publication of Giving USA and the Global Philanthropy Indices and directs the school’s research program with its partners including US Trust, United Way Worldwide, Coutts Inc, and National Collegiate Athletic Association.
Pamela Wiepking
Visiting Stead Family Chair in International Philanthropy and Visiting Associate Professor of Philanthropic Studies at Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, IUPUI
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About the Researcher
Pamala Wiepking (the Netherlands, 1978) is the inaugural Visiting Stead Family Chair in International Philanthropy at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and the inaugural Professor of Societal Significance of Charity Lotteries at the Center for Philanthropic Studies at VU Amsterdam. Wiepking studies cross-national and interdisciplinary explanations of philanthropy and is the 2017 UMD SPP Do Good Institute-ARNOVA Award for Global Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership recipient. Wiepking is co-editor (with Femida Handy) of the Palgrave Handbook of Global Philanthropy, which won the 2016 ARNOVA Virginia A. Hodgkinson Research Book Prize, is a member of the editorial board for the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly and the International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, is one of the founding members of the European Research Network on Philanthropy, and is also board member of the Dutch Fundraising Institute (NLFL).
Project Title
Resisting and Rationalizing State-Inspired Violence in the Philippines
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In 2016, Rodrigo Duterte ran for President of the Philippines on a “tough on crime” platform, warning he would ratchet up the “war on drugs” and kill 100,000 criminals if elected. After a resounding victory, he reiterated his commitment to the strategy during his inauguration speech by telling the Filipino people, “If you know of any addicts, go ahead and kill them yourself.” In the first six months of Duterte’s presidency, 7,025 Filipinos, (34 a day) suspected of using or selling drugs were killed by the police or vigilante groups. Though overwhelmingly Christian, the Philippines appears to be divided on Duterte’s policies. The question that interests our research team is, how do practicing Catholics and Protestants both resist and rationalize state-inspired violence in Duterte’s Philippines?
Andrew Johnson
Professor of Criminal Justice at Metropolitan State University
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About the Researcher
Andrew Johnson is an Assistant Professor at Metropolitan State University, part of the Minnesota State system. He is the author of If I Give My Soul: Faith Behind Bars in Rio de Janeiro (Oxford University Press, 2017) and Co-Director of a documentary film by the same name. He also published an eight-part series on boxing and religion with Huffington Post.
Jayeel Cornelio
Associate Professor of Development Studies at Ateneo de Manila University
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About the Researcher
Jayeel Cornelio, PhD is the Director of the Development Studies Program at the Ateneo de Manila University and an associate editor of the journal Social Sciences and Missions. He has written extensively about religious transformations in relation to youth, politics, and civil society in the Philippines. His opinion pieces have been published by Rappler, New Mandala, Christianity Today, and the Union of Catholic Asian News.
James Densley
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Metropolitan State University
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About the Researcher
James Densley, PhD (Oxford), is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Metropolitan State University, part of the Minnesota State system. He is the author of two books and close to 50 refereed articles and book chapters on street gangs, criminal networks, violence, and policing. He has also written for CNN, The Conversation, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal.
Project Title
Beyond Diaspora Islam: Transnational Networks and the Localization of Islam in Chile and Argentina
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Our collaborative research project examines the local meaning and practice of Islam among the Chilean Muslim community of Santiago, Chile, and its relationship to Argentine Muslim institutions. Specifically, it considers how the institutionalization of Islam in Chile reflects transnational links to Argentine institutions and how transmission between these communities relates to the development of a universal Islam.
Michael Perez
Assistant Professor of Anthropology at University of Memphis
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About the Researcher
Michael Vicente Pérez is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Memphis. His research examines the impact of long-term displacement in the Middle East with a particular focus on stateless Palestinians in Jordan. Dr. Pérez received his PhD in Cultural Anthropology at Michigan State University in 2011 and currently holds the Human Rights seat for the Members' Programmatic Advisory and Advocacy Committee (MPAAC) in the American Anthropological Association (AAA).
Marisol Facuse
Associate Professor of Sociology at Universidad de Chile
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About the Researcher
Dr. Marisol Facuse earned her doctorate in the sociology of art and culture and a master's in the sociology of art and the imaginary at Grenoble University. She also earned a master's of philosophy and sociology at Concepcion University. Dr. Facuse is currently Associate Professor in the Sociology Department of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Chile and coordinator of the Sociology of Art Center and Cultural Practices. She is a member of the Sociology Working Group of Art and Culture for the Latin American Sociology Association and of the sociology of art for the Chilean Congress of Sociology. Dr. Facuse is also a professional member of the organizing Committee of RC in the International Association of Sociology. Her main research areas concern art and politics, popular culture, immigration and music, and cultural hybridity (Mestizaje).
Valentina Fajreldin
Assistant Professor of Physical Sciences at Universidad de Chile
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About the Researcher
Dr. Fajreldin is a social anthropologist and member of the dentistry faculty at the University of Chile. She earned a Masters of Public Health from the University of Chile, and a PhD in Anthropology and Communication from URV in Catalonia, Spain.
Matthew Ingalls
Associate Professor of International and Middle Eastern Studies at American University of Dubai
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About the Researcher
Matthew Ingalls is Associate Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at the American University in Dubai. His research examines developments in Sufism and Islamic law from the later Islamic Middle Period with a particular focus on pre-modern Muslim commentary texts and their role in intellectual change. From 2010 to 2016, Matthew was Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, while he received his doctorate in 2011 from Yale University's Department of Religious Studies. In 2014, Matthew was a fellow at the Annemarie Schimmel Kolleg for Mamluk Studies in Bonn, Germany. He is currently co-authoring a book on the history of Islam in Egypt, which has been contracted for Princeton University Press.
Project Title
Religion and Policing in the Pacific Island Countries (PICs)
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This research project focuses on Tuvalu as a pilot study for a larger comparative research study in the PICs on how the changing place and structure of religion is impacting on policing that will examine the following specific research questions: 1) How is religion mobilized in mandated and discretionary policing practices? 2) What motivations and rationalizations surround the use of religion in policing practices? 3) How is the use of religion in policing practices perceived by police, religious institutions, chiefly authorities and the state?
Tanya Trussler
Associate Professor of Department of Economics, Justice, and Policy Studies at Mount Royal University
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About the Researcher
Dr. Tanya Trussler is Associate Professor in the Department of Economics, Justice, and Policy Studies at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Canada. Dr. Trussler is also an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University of Calgary. Her primary research interests focus on interpersonal violence, policing, crime reduction, and social determinants of risk. She has published and presented in the areas of: violent and non-violent recidivism, structural covariates of interpersonal violence, policing, rural crime, and approaches to crime reduction through design.
Sara Nuzhat Amin
Lecturer of Sociology at University of the South Pacific
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About the Researcher
Dr. Sara N. Amin is Lecturer and Discipline Coordinator of Sociology at The University of the South Pacific, Fiji. Her research and teaching interests center on the sociology of identity, religion, gender, migration and education. Her research has been funded by various organizations including the Canadian Social Science and Humanities Research Council, the Fulbright Foundation and the Ford Foundation.
Danielle Watson
Lecturer of Policing Studies at University of the South Pacific
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About the Researcher
Dr. Danielle Watson is the coordinator of the Pacific Policing Programme at The University of the South Pacific, Fiji. She conducts research on police/civilian relations on the margins with interests in hotspot policing, police recruitment and training as well as many other areas specific to policing in developing country contexts. She is the principal researcher on two ongoing projects “Policing Marginalized Communities in the Global South” and “Re-Imagining Graduate Supervision at Regional Universities”.
Project Title
Religiosity and forces of globalization in the UAE
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This project examines how globalization shapes religious stability and change among citizens of the UAE. We adopt a mixed-methods approach, comprising qualitative interviews and an experiment. We will first build a network of local citizen collaborators, and engage their participation to conduct focus groups with young adults and parents about their religiosity and inter-generational religious transmission. Second, we will conduct a lab experiment to test whether exposure to consumerist practices and values influences religious priorities. This two-pronged approach will help us identify mechanisms through which rapid globalization shapes religious stability and change.
Brandon Vaidyanathan
Associate Professor of Sociology at Catholic University of America
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About the Researcher
Dr. Brandon Vaidyanathan is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology at The Catholic University of America. He was born and raised in the Arabian Gulf and holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Notre Dame. His research examines the cultural dimensions of religious, commercial, medical, and scientific institutions. He is author of Mercenaries and Missionaries: Capitalism and Catholicism in the Global South (Cornell University Press, 2019) and co-author of Secularity and Science: What Scientists Around the World Really Think About Religion (Oxford University Press, 2019).
Mark Aveyard
Assistant Professor of Psychology and International Studies at American University Shahjah
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About the Researcher
Mark Aveyard is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Studies at American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates. He earned his PhD in Psychology from Florida State University. He studies religious and moral behavior.
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