Global Religion Research Initiative

Round 2 Award Recipients

Congratulations to the Round 2 Global Religion Research Initiative award recipients! The GRRI received more than 160 research proposals from scholars at 59 colleges and universities around the world in the second round of competition, which closed in mid-October. The submissions were reviewed by leading social science scholars and 49 of the proposals were awarded funding this round.

The GRRI will accept one more round of funding proposals. Third round proposals will be due in October 2018.

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Book Leave Fellowships
Postdoctoral Research Fellowships
Project Launch Grants
Project Title
Keepers of the Garden: Abrahamic Religions and Support for Environmental Protection in Brazil and Kenya
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In this two-country comparative investigation, Smith and Honig seek qualitative evidence that can contribute to explaining a puzzle of theoretical and practical importance: the dramatically varying relationship between environmentalism and religion across the developing world. Though longstanding theories hold that Christian theology is harmful to the environment (a position known as the “Lynn White thesis”), new research shows that Pentecostalism, Catholicism, and Islam each sometimes promote and sometimes inhibit environmental awareness. Smith and Honig will conduct qualitative fieldwork in Brazil and Kenya to understand how Catholics, Pentecostals, and Muslims explain environmental degradation and climate change, as well as what they perceive as appropriate solutions.
Amy Erica Smith
Assistant Professor of Political Science at Iowa State University
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About the Researcher
Amy Erica Smith is Assistant Professor of political science at Iowa State University. Her research seeks to explain how citizens in the developing world interpret their political worlds and take action to promote democracy, representation, and good governance. Her work has appeared in many peer-reviewed outlets, including the American Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, and Comparative Political Studies; and it has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Fulbright, Mellon, and a Kellogg Visiting Fellowship from Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Studies.
Lauren Hoing
Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston College
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About the Researcher
Lauren Honig is Assistant Professor of political science at Boston College. Her research interests include African politics, state-building, natural resource governance, and the political economy of development. She is currently completing a book manuscript on customary authority and land politics in Zambia and Senegal. She has received funding from the National Science Foundation, the Social Sciences Research Council, Fulbright, and the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at Notre Dame. Her work has been published in Comparative Politics and World Development.
Project Title
The Rise of Evangelical Political Organizations in Latin America
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Evangelical Christianity has, in the preceding decade, become a veritable political force throughout Latin America. Whether forming openly evangelical parties, encouraging individual pastors to use their church’s organizational infrastructure to run from within non-exclusively religious parties, forming evangelical social movement organizations with the aim of taking over existing party apparatuses, or assembling alliances between Christian churches and parties for certain elections, the growth of evangelical political presence throughout Latin America is unmistakable. What explains this rise? To answer this question this project undertakes a comparative investigation of the complex relationships between evangelical politics, class, and secularization processes in Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil and Venezuela. The project aims to shed light on the possibilities, limits and stakes of contemporary negotiations of religion, secularism and popular politics.
Edwin Ackerman
Assistant Professor of Sociology at Syracuse University
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About the Researcher
Edwin F. Ackerman is an assistant professor of sociology at Syracuse University. He holds a PhD in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Ackerman is a political sociologist that uses comparative-historical methods to study party formation in Latin America.
Graham Hill
Postdoctoral Researcher of Sociology at University of Bern
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About the Researcher
Graham Hill has a PhD in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Sociology Institute of the University of Bern, where, with the support of a grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation, he is doing research on Freemasonry and the ethics and politics of secularism. Hill is a sociologist of religion, culture and politics, and his current projects focus on relationships between the secular and the religious in late modernity.
Project Title
Religion and Compromise: Experimental Evidence from Tunisia
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Are religious conservatives less willing to compromise than secular conservatives? If so, does engaging religious conservatives with liberal religious reinterpretations facilitate compromise? We investigate these questions through a series of laboratory experiments in Tunisia. We offer a novel behavioral measure of compromise by examining whether a pair of respondents are able to reach a compromise in a debate. By priming respondents with religious justifications for their side, our design better isolates the effect of religion from its correlates than prior observational studies.
Sharan Grewal
PhD Candidate in Political Science at Princeton University
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About the Researcher
Sharan Grewal is a PhD candidate in Politics at Princeton University, where he studies democratization, civil-military relations, and religion, especially in the Middle East and North Africa. His dissertation investigates why some militaries stage coups against nascent democracies, focusing on Egypt and Tunisia. He has conducted interviews, surveys, and lab experiments in Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, and Turkey.
Matthew Cebul
PhD Candidate in Political Science at Yale University
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About the Researcher
Matthew Cebul is a doctoral candidate in political science at Yale University, specializing in international relations and authoritarian politics with a regional focus on the Middle East. His dissertation project investigates the effects of international ​engagement on ​the behavior of opposition activists during popular uprisings​, focusing on the 2011 Syrian Revolution.
Project Title
Religion and Social and Economic Assimilation of Immigrants in China
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As China becomes the second largest economy in the world and more prosperous, it is in the process of transition from an immigrant-sending country to an immigrant-receiving country in the 21st century. In this project, we focus on African and Middle Eastern immigrants in Guangzhou and Yiwu in China. We plan to study how religion is facilitating the adaptation process for these two major immigrant groups in China. The seed grant from GRRI will allow us to plan and initiate a new project of a comparative study of religion and immigrant adaptation and explore innovative hypotheses concerning religion, race, and immigrant adaptation in China.
Zai Liang
Professor of Sociology at SUNY Albany
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About the Researcher
Zai Liang is Professor of Sociology and Core Director of Center for Social and Demographic Analysis at State University of New York at Albany. He is also Co-director of Urban China Research Network, an international research organization of urban China scholars. His main research interests are internal migration in China, international migration, urban sociology and inequality. He has published in many leading sociology and demography journals such as Annual Review of Sociology, American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, Social Science Research, and Population and Development Review among others. His research has been supported by many funding agencies including the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Ford Foundation, and China Social Science and Philosophy Foundation.
Daming Zhou
Professor of Anthropology at Sun Yat-Sen University
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About the Researcher
Daming Zhou is Changjiang Scholar Professor of Anthropology in the School of Sociology and Anthropology at the Sun Yat-sen University in China. He is also the Research Director of the Center for Migration and Ethnic Studies (CMES). Professor Zhou studies ethnicity and urbanization in China and he is one of the most well-known anthropologists in China. His work has been published by Routledge and in various academic journals including the Chinese Sociology and Anthropology.
Tao Xu
Associate Professor of Sociology at Zhejiang Normal University
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About the Researcher
Tao Xu, PhD, is an associate professor of sociology and an adjunct researcher at the Institute of African Studies at Zhejiang Normal University, China. His main research interests are internal and international migration, social stratification, and social inequality.
Dissertation Year Fellowships
International Collaboration Grants
Project Title
Life History and Mémographie: Encountering socio-religious change in Senegal
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Our project examines how contemporary socio-religious change emerging from the confrontation of local and global Islam has impacted processes of individual and collective meaning-making in Senegal and northwest Africa. We will foster the institutionalization of research cooperation between our two universities by bringing Columbia University researcher to Senegal to conduct a training course in life history, ethnographic, and historical methods for Senegalese graduate students. We will hold a conference in Senegal to bring relevant scholars of northwest Africa and Columbia University together to develop a new research agenda. We will also bring Gaston Berger University faculty to New York to conduct a three-day workshop on the method of mémographie and the place of Islam in Senegalese public life.
Katherine Ewing
Professor of Religion at Columbia University
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About the Researcher
Katherine Pratt Ewing is Professor of Religion and Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life at Columbia University. She has done ethnographic fieldwork in South Asia and among Muslims in Europe and the United States focused on debates among Muslims about the proper practice of Islam in the modern world, including current ACLS/Mellon-funded research on Sufism in northwest Africa. Her books include Arguing Sainthood: Modernity, Psychoanalysis and Islam (Duke, 1997) and Stolen Honor: Stigmatizing Muslim Men in Berlin (Stanford, 2008).
Mame Penda-Ba
Professor of Political Science at Gaston Berger University of Saint Louis, Senegal
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About the Researcher
Mame Penda-Ba is Associate Professor in Political science at Gaston Berger University in Saint-Louis (Senegal). She is the Deputy Dean of the Department of Law and Political Sciences. She also manages the Laboratory for the Analysis of Societies and Powers / Africa-Diaspora (LASPAD / www.laspad.org) which includes an Observatory on Religious issues in Africa. She is member of an Interdisciplinary Research Group (PRIVEREL) on religion in private space. Her research interest covers analysis of public policies, gender studies, political sociology of religion, and the socio-genesis and dynamics of the state in Africa. She lectures Religion and Politics – Religious Extremism, Gender and Democracy.
Blondin Cissé
Lecturer in Religious Studies at Gaston Berger University of Saint Louis, Senegal
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About the Researcher
Blondin Cissé graduated from Paris Diderot University-Paris in Political Science and Philosophy. As a researcher at CSPRP in Paris VII Denis Diderot (LCSP), where he teaches political philosophy from 2009 to 2012, his thinking focuses on political public space and Islamic philosophy.
Wendell Marsh
PhD Candidate in Sociology and Anthropology at Columbia University
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About the Researcher
Wendell Hassan Marsh is a doctoral candidate in African Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. His work explores the historical encounter of Islam and the African world as mediated in Afro-Arabic texts. More broadly, Wendell is interested in contemporary historical transformations in northwestern Africa and the politics of knowledge production. From Atlanta, Georgia, Wendell has enjoyed extended study, research and travels in Senegal, Egypt, and Morocco.
Abdourahmane Seck
Lecturer in Religious Studies at Gaston Berger University of Saint Louis, Senegal
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About the Researcher
Abdourahmane Seck is an anthropologist and historian based in the Faculty of Civilizations, Religions, Arts and Communication University Gaston Berger of Saint-Louis, where he teaches at the Centre for the Study of Religions. Dr Seck is the author of several works on Islam and the south-south migration. He led the religions Study Centre of the University Gaston Berger between 2012 and 2014, an d is currently the Deputy Director of the Laboratory for Analysis of Societies and Powers / Africa -Diasporas (LASPAD) and coordinator of the Observatory of African diasporas (OAD).
Rachid Yasine
Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies at Gaston Berger University of Saint Louis, Senegal
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About the Researcher
Rachid Yasine is a sociologist and anthropologist, appointed as a senior lecturer at the Center for the Study of Religions (UFR CRAC) at Gaston Berger University (Senegal). And a visiting professor at Sciences Po Lyon (France). He taught at the University of Perpignan (France, 2007-2015) before attending the Saint-Louis University in Brussels (Belgium). He is also a researcher and member of office of the LASPAD (UGB), and coordinates the African Observatory of the Religious.
Project Title
“Little Hanois” and “Little Saigons”: Religion and Politics in Vietnamese Diasporas in Europe
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Vietnam’s history of the war between rival capitals in Hanoi and Saigon has meant that overseas communities in the United States, Australia, and Canada are overwhelmingly made up of refugees from southern Vietnam, while overseas communities in Europe (Prague, Berlin, Warsaw and Moscow) are made up of students and contract workers who came from northern Vietnam. Building on previous research in California’s “Little Saigons”, this project looks at the ritual life of the “Little Hanois”, where a resurgence of popular religious practices has accompanied postsocialist development. We propose to document how regional differences have traveled to new destinations and interacted with the cosmopolitan challenges of practicing Vietnamese religion in secular European countries. Generational differences, ritual uses of the flags of Saigon and Hanoi, and the worship of nature-based mother goddesses will all be explored in these new settings, to prepare a co-authored comparative analysis.
Janet Hoskins
Professor of Anthropology and Religion at University of Southern California
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About the Researcher
Janet Hoskins is Professor of Anthropology and Religion at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Her books include The Divine Eye and the Diaspora: Vietnamese Syncretism Becomes Transpacific Caodaism (2015), The Play of Time: Kodi Perspectives on History, Calendars and Exchange (1996 Benda Prize in Southeast Asian Studies, Association for Asian Studies), and Biographical Objects: How Things Tell the Stories of People’s Lives (1998). She is the contributing editor of Transpacific Studies: Framing an Emerging Field (with Viet Thanh Nguyen, 2014), Headhunting and the Social Imagination in Southeast Asia (1996), A Space Between Oneself and Oneself: Anthropology as a Search for the Subject (1999) and Fragments from Forests and Libraries (2001).
Nguyen Thi Hien
Vice Director of the National Institute of Culture and Arts Studies in Hanoi, Viet Nam
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About the Researcher
Nguyen Thi Hien is an Associate Professor and the Vice Director of Viet Nam National Institute of Culture and Arts Studies, Ministry of Culture, Sports, and Tourism in Hanoi, Viet Nam. After earning her PhD in Folklore from Indiana University, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and UCLA. Some of her main publications include The Religion of Four Palaces: Mediumship and Therapy in Viet Culture (The Gioi Publishing House, 2016); Spirits Without Borders: The Legacy of Vietnamese Mediumship in a Transnational Era (co-authored with Karen Fjelstad) (Palgrave Macmillan Publisher, 2011); Possessed by the Spirits: Mediumship in Contemporary Vietnamese Communities (co-edited with Dr. Karen Fjelstad) (Cornell Southeast Asia Program, Cornell University, 2006); “Cultural Adaptation, Tradition, and Identity of Diasporic Vietnamese People A Case Study in Silicon Valley, California, USA” (Asian Ethnology).
Project Title
Overlapping Fields: Religion and the Politics of Social Entrepreneurship in Uganda
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The project is a qualitative study of how religion shapes the formation and success of grassroots leaders in the field of social welfare, that is, Ugandan social entrepreneurs. Employing a combination of in-depth interviews, focus groups, and community survey techniques, we seek to understand the role of religious beliefs, practices, and institutional structures in the formation of such leaders and their organizations; how interreligious dynamics influence their efforts; and how religion matters for the development of trusting relationships between these leaders and the communities they seek to help. We focus on such leaders and their relationships to their constituents as a way of understanding the larger overlapping religious, political, and social welfare fields in Uganda, and ultimately to show how religion contributes to social transformation by motivating and enabling certain forms of local transformative action.
Nicolette Manglos-Weber
Assistant Professor of Sociology at Kansas State University
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About the Researcher
Nicolette Manglos-Weber is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Kansas State University. She is a mixed-methods researcher who studies religion and politics in Anglophone sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on the political and social impacts of local religious leaders and congregations. She also studies the role of religious communities in the integration of immigrants to the United States.
Fr. John Mary Mooka Kamweri
Director of the Institute of Ethics at Uganda Martyrs University
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About the Researcher
Rev. John Mary Mooka Kamweri, PhD is a Duquesne University trained bioethicist. He is currently the Director of the Institute of Ethics at Uganda Martyrs University. He also serves as the Chairperson of Management of Social Transformation Taskforce (MOST) of the Uganda National Commission for UNESCO.
Jimmy Spire Ssentongo
Chair of the Center for African Studies at Uganda Martyrs University
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About the Researcher
Jimmy Spire Ssentongo is an Associate Dean (in charge of Research and Publications) of the School of Postgraduate Studies and Research at Uganda Martyrs University. He also heads the Center for African Studies at the same university and is a columnist plus editorial cartoonist with The Observer, a national newspaper. His academic background is in Philosophy, with specialisation in Ethics. He has published several journal articles and book chapters in the areas of pluralism, social justice, and sustainability.
Project Title
Shaping Citizenship: Christian Institutions and Urban Youth in Africa
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The project explores the relationship between Christian institutions and citizenship among youth in urban Africa. Defined as people 15-29 years old, African youth comprise 40 percent of the continent’s population and often face a precarious socioeconomic situation. Through an innovative, four-stage research design that uses quantitative analysis, as well as interviews, focus groups, and process tracing of oral histories conducted in Ghana, Tanzania, and Uganda, this project will investigate the following questions: (1) How do Christian institutions shape citizenship norms and behaviors among African youth? (2) How do Christian institutions prioritize particular citizenship norms and behaviors, depending on the gender and economic standing of youth? (3) How do these Christian efforts influence how youth themselves understand citizenship and act on that citizenship?
Amy Patterson
Professor of Politics at University of the South, Sewanee
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About the Researcher
Amy S. Patterson is Professor of Politics at University of the South (Sewanee). She has conducted fieldwork in Senegal, Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, and Zambia. She is author of The Politics of AIDS in Africa, The Church and AIDS in Africa, and Africa in Global Health Governance, and co-author of Dependent Agency in the Global AIDS Regime. She has published articles on health, religion, and civil society in numerous African studies, political science and public health journals. She teaches courses on African politics and the politics of health and development.
Richard Asante
Senior Research Fellow in the Institute of African Studies at University of Ghana
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About the Researcher
Richard Asante holds a PhD in political science, and a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer in the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon. Asante's research interests spans social capital, civil society and democratization, religion and politics.
Megan Hershey
Associate Professor of Political Science at Whitworth University
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About the Researcher
Megan Hershey is an Associate Professor of political science at Whitworth University, in Spokane, WA. Her research focuses on HIV/AIDS-prevention NGOs, and youth politics, in east Africa. She teaches courses on development and African politics and also leads study abroad trips to Tanzania and South Africa.
Phoebe Kajubi
Researcher at The Institute for Disease Investigations, Uganda
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About the Researcher
Phoebe Kajubi (Makerere University, Uganda) is a Social Scientist and has a PhD in Health Sciences. Since 1995, she has conducted academic and applied research especially in HIV/AIDS social research among HIV-positive children and youth in Uganda.
Tracy Kuperus
Professor in International Development at Calvin College
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About the Researcher
Tracy Kuperus is a political scientist teaching in the International Development Studies at Calvin College, USA. Her research interests include state-civil society relations, democratization and citizen mobilization efforts, and religion and politics. She has published books, numerous book chapters in edited volumes, and articles in journals like African Affairs, The Journal of Modern Africa, and The Journal of Church and State.
Colman Titus Msoka
Lecturer in the Institute of Development Studies at University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
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About the Researcher
Colman T. Msoka, PhD Sociology is a Senior Lecturer, Institute of Development Studies at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He has a background in Economics and Population Studies. In 2016/17, he was a Fulbright Scholar in Residence at Whitworth University. His teaching and research works are at the intersections of social development and urban studies, with publications in journals such as Tanzania Journal of Development Studies, Journal of Sociology and Development, and Le Journal des Sciences Sociales.
Project Title
Exploring Spiritual Security: The Moroccan Monarchy and Moderate Islam
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Responding to the post-9/11 growth of global Muslim extremist networks, the Moroccan monarchy has developed a holistic counter-terrorism approach by coupling domestic surveillance and international intelligence sharing with Islamic doctrinal and educational reform grounded in local traditions of Sufism, Islam’s inner or mystical spiritual tradition. Our project focuses on the Morocco’s reform efforts by surveying, interviewing, and observing current students and past graduates of its most celebrated training programs, which authorize Muslim imams and spiritual guides to assume positions of leadership in Morocco, Europe, and West Africa. Through our research we seek to understand and describe this globally influential, non-fundamentalist form of Islamic governance and grasp its implications for democratic growth and peace in and beyond the Muslim world. themselves understand citizenship and act on that citizenship?
Emilio Spadola
Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Colgate University
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About the Researcher
Emilio Spadola (PhD, Columbia University 2007), is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Middle East and Islamic Studies at Colgate University, Visiting Associate Professor of Anthropology at Tufts University, and President of the Middle East Section of the American Anthropological Association. His work examines intersections of religion, media, security, and modernity in Morocco and the Muslim World. His book, The Calls of Islam: Sufis, Islamists, and Mass Mediation in Urban Morocco (Indiana, 2014), was awarded Honorable Mention for both the 2014 Clifford Geertz Book Prize, by the Society for the Anthropology of Religion, and the 2015 L. Carl Brown Book Prize, by the American Institute of Maghrib Studies.
Meriem El Haitami
Assistant Professor of Language, Cultures, and Civilizations at Université International de Rabat, Morocco
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About the Researcher
Meriem El Haitami is an Assistant Professor of English and Gender Studies at l’Université Internationle de Rabat. She holds a PhD in Cultural Studies from the University of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah in Fez, Morocco. El Haitami’s teaching and research interests include the emergence of female religious authorities; religious performance including ritual, musical, and social; the study of gender and sexuality in Islamic contexts; feminist exegesis of the Qur’an; social movements and body politics.
Project Title
After the Last “Firman:” Victimhood, Survival and Societal Transformation among the Yazidis
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The self-styled Islamic State’s (IS) violence against the Yazidis, a religious minority, in the Sinjar area of northern Iraq, in the summer of 2014 resulted in mass executions, enslavements, and displacements. This project develops a cross-continental collaboration among three scholars from the United States, Iraqi Kurdistan, and United Kingdom to offer a comprehensive study of the Yazidi community at three interrelated dimensions: (a) the transformation and resiliency of Yazidi beliefs and norms in the wake of the genocidal violence, (b) the evolution of gender relations among the Yazidis in the wake of sexual enslavement of Yazidi women, and (c) the nature of relations between Yazidis and Sunni Arabs and Kurds. It will integrate the study of Yazidis into the mainstream social science literature on religion, political violence, post-conflict reconciliation, and gender relations. It entails a bottom-up perspective entailing extensive fieldwork that will document the diversity of the Yazidi experience beyond simplistic narratives.
Güneş Tezcür
Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Central Florida
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About the Researcher
Güneş Murat Tezcür (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is the Jalal Talabani Chair of Kurdish Political Studies at the University of Central Florida. He also directs the Kurdish Political Studies Program, the only academic unit dedicated to the study of Kurdish issues in the U.S. He is a social scientist studying political violence and identity, and democratic struggles in the broader Middle East and beyond. His work has appeared in many journals such as American Political Science Review, Comparative Politics, Journal of Peace Research, Law and Society Review and Political Research Quarterly. He is also the author of Muslim Reformers in Iran and Turkey. Two of his current research projects examine the motives of ordinary men and women joining armed groups, focusing on the Kurdish insurgency, and the gendered dynamics of mass violence, focusing on the attacks against the Yazidis.
Zeynep Kaya
Research Fellow at the Middle East Center at London School of Economics
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About the Researcher
Zeynep is Research Fellow at the LSE Middle East Centre and the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security. She is also Lecturer at the Pembroke-King's Programme, University of Cambridge. Zeynep’s current research interests focus on displacement, gender, conflict and the implementation of the WPS agenda in Iraq. Her wider research interests are in the international politics of the Middle East with a focus on Kurdish politics in Iraq, Syria and Turkey, as well as Turkish domestic politics and foreign policy in the Middle East. Zeynep completed her PhD in International Relations at LSE and is working on her book Mapping Kurdistan: Self-determination, Territoriality and Quest for Statehood.
Bayar Mustafa
Associate Professor of International Studies at American University of Kurdistan
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About the Researcher
Dr. Bayar is an Assistant Professor at the College of International Studies at the American University of Kurdistant. He has published widely on foreign and regional affairs in Turkey and Kurdistan. His PhD is from Mosul University (Iraq), and he completed post-doctoral work at Istanbul Bilgi University.
Project Title
Innovative Reliogiosity and multi-religious spaces in postwar Sri Lanka
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Whitaker and Rajasingham-Senanayake will conduct collaborative, ethnographic fieldwork at multi-religious sites and spaces of religious innovation, including gendered innovation, in rural and urban settings in Sri Lanka, in the context of an otherwise, communally segregated public culture and popular media. Our research seeks to ascertain if and how sites and practices of multi-religious innovation may have a mitigating effect on this Indian Ocean island nation’s present and future inter-religious and intra-religious tensions. Since Sri Lanka’s 26 year war (1983-2009) ended eight years ago, there has been “a turn to religion” by all the Island’s major religious groups -- Buddhist, Christian, Hindu and Muslim -- evident in the building and restoration of religious shrines, and in religious innovations at the margins of accepted religiosity.
Mark Whitaker
Professor of Anthropology at University of Kentucky
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About the Researcher
Mark P. Whitaker is a professor of Anthropology at the University of Kentucky. His research interests include religion, politics, nationalism, diaspora, morality, epistemology, biography, and ethno-religious conflict. He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork among Tamil speaking people in Sri Lanka since 1981, and in Toronto since 2001. He is the author of Amiable Incoherence: Manipulating Histories and Modernities in a Batticaloa Hindu Temple (1999) and Learning Politics from Sivaram: The Life and Death of a Revolutionary Tamil Journalist in Sri Lanka (2007).
Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake
Senior Research Associate at the International Center for Ethnic Studies in Colombo, Sri Lanka
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About the Researcher
Darini Rajasingham-Senanayake, is a cultural anthropologist with research expertise in the international political economic analysis of race and ethno-religious identity conflict, and gender in peace building and development. A research fellow at the International Center for Ethnic Studies, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, her work spans topics in post-colonial modernity, violence, migration,multiculturalism, and multi-religion; and more recently, new and old South Asian Diasporas and transnational Buddhism. She is the Co-author of the book "Ethnic Futures: the State and Identity Politics in Asia" among other publications.
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